Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a new technique using high-frequency alternating magnetic fields to heat artificial joints in the body

A short exposure to an alternating magnetic field might someday replace multiple surgeries and weeks of IV antibiotics as treatment for stubborn infections on artificial joints, new research suggests. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have shown that high-frequency alternating magnetic fields – the same principle used in induction cooktops – can be used to destroy bacteria that are encased in a slimy “biofilm” growing on a metal surface. The biofilm is a collection of microorganis...
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Kennedy Scientists Developing Technology to Remove Martian Dust

NASA's Journey to Mars requires cutting-edge technologies to solve the problems explorers will face on the Red Planet. Scientists at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida are developing some of the needed solutions. Dr. Carlos Calle, lead scientist in the center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory, and Jay Phillips, a research physicist working there, are developing an electrostatic precipitator to help solve the dust problem. "Commodities such as oxygen water and me...
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Boston Children’s Hospital have found a new way to non-invasively relieve pain at local sites in the body using ultrasound

According to the CDC, 91 people die from opioid overdoses every day in the U.S. Here in Massachusetts, the state has an opioid-related death rate that is more than twice the national average. “Opioid abuse is a growing problem in healthcare,” says Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, a senior associate in critical care medicine at Boston Children’s and professor of anesthesiology at Harvard Medical School. Now, Kohane and other scientists who are developing triggerable drug delivery systems at Bost...
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North Carolina State University Spheroid Stem Cell Production Sows Hope for IPF (Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis)Treatment

In a small pilot study, researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a rapid, simple way to generate large numbers of lung stem cells for use in disease treatment. This method of harvesting and growing a patient’s own lung stem cells shows promise in mice for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and could one day provide human IPF sufferers with an effective, less invasive method of treatment for their disease. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic ir...
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Hover Camera Passport – Self-Flying Camera

The Hover Camera Passport, a drone designed for taking selfies. Hover Camera Passport is an autonomous self-flying camera that follows you and records your travel moments in 13MP photos and 4K video. You can now buy the flying camera today and ask for an in-store demonstration at select Apple stores. Passport is a flying camera in a class of its own, that’s portable, safe, truly easy-to-fly right out of the box, and lightweight at just 242 grams (0.55 pounds). Take it on your wanderlust so...
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University of Chicago genetically modified skin cells to produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) protein that is beneficial in diabetes and obesity

A research team based at the University of Chicago has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy and demonstrated how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat many human diseases. In the August 3, 2017 issue of the journal Cell Stem Cell, the researchers provide “proof-of-concept.” They describe gene-therapy administered through skin transplants to treat two related and extremely common human ailments: type-2 diabetes a...
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Drug developed at the University of Rochester Medical Center protected mice from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

A drug developed at the University of Rochester Medical Center protected mice from one of the many ills of our cheeseburger and milkshake-laden Western diet – non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In a study out today in the journal JCI Insights, scientists report that a drug called “URMC-099” reversed liver inflammation, injury and scarring in animals fed a diet high in fat, sugar and cholesterol. The diet was designed to replicate the Western fast food diet and recreate the features of non-alc...
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DIABETES SENTRY is a non-invasive, wearable electronic device which sounds an alarm when blood glucose threshold readings have been reached

The DIABETES SENTRY is an affordable, non-invasive, wearable electronic device which sounds an alarm while being worn on the wrist, ankle, or bicep of persons with diabetes whose blood glucose has begun to trend downward. In 90% of the cases, persons with diabetes show one or both of two hallmark symptoms of trending toward hypoglycemia, increased perspiration and a drop in skin temperature. This patient base is considered to be symptomatic. The 10% of individuals with diabetes that do NOT...
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Tesla battery researcher unveils new chemistry to increase lifecycle at high voltage

Historical data from Tesla’s current battery packs show about 5% capacity degradation after 50,000 miles (80,000 km) and the capacity levels off for about 150,000 more miles before hitting 90% capacity. Those are already pretty good results, but Tesla aims to do better with Jeff Dahn, a renowned battery researcher and the leader of Tesla’s research partnership through his battery-research group at Dalhousie University. The scientist and his team recently unveiled their latest research on a...
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Soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients, opening new approaches to gait re-training and rehabilitation

soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients, opening new approaches to gait re-training and rehabilitation Upright walking on two legs is a defining trait in humans, enabling them to move very efficiently throughout their environment. This can all change in the blink of an eye when a stroke occurs. In about 80% of patients post-stroke, it is typical that one limb loses its ability to function normally — a clinical phenomenon called hemiparesis. And even patients ...
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KARLSRUHER INSTITUT FÜR TECHNOLOGIE (KIT) Solar glasses

These Solar Glasses with lens-fitted semitransparent organic solar cells supply two sensors and electronics in the temples with electric power. Source: Photo: KIT Organic solar cells are flexible, transparent, and light-weight - and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colors. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realized with conventional silicon solar cells. In the Energy Technology journal, researchers from KIT now prese...
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Salk Institute, Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and Korea’s Institute for Basic Science research scientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing.

EARLY GENE-EDITING SUCCESS HOLDS PROMISE FOR PREVENTING INHERITED DISEASES Scientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos Scientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos Scientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing. The technique, which uses the CRISPR-Cas9 system, corrected the mutation for a heart condition at the earliest stage of ...
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NASA Plant Researchers Explore Production Of Food Crops In Space

NASA plant physiologist Ray Wheeler, Ph.D., and fictional astronaut Mark Watney from the movie "The Martian" have something in common — they are both botanists. But that's where the similarities end. While Watney is a movie character who gets stranded on Mars, Wheeler is the lead for Advanced Life Support Research activities in the Exploration Research and Technology Program at Kennedy Space Center, working on real plant research. "The Martian movie and book conveyed a lot of issues regarding...
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Airborne Wireless Network is in the process of creating a high-speed broadband airborne wireless network by linking commercial aircraft in flight.

Airborne Wireless Network Airborne Wireless Network is in the process of creating a high-speed broadband airborne wireless network by linking commercial aircraft in flight. Each aircraft participating in the network will act as an airborne repeater or router sending and receiving broadband signals from one aircraft to the next creating a digital superhighway in the sky. ABWN intends is to be a high-speed broadband internet pipeline to improve coverage connectivity where lacking. ABWN does not...
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VCU Massey Cancer Center Scientists targeted the gene CtBP with a drug known as HIPP (2-hydroxy-imino phenylpyruvic acid) and were able to reduce the development of pre-cancerous polyps by half for colon cancer

Preclinical experiments, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a new way in which colon cancer develops, as well as a potential “silver bullet” for preventing and treating it. The findings may extend to ovarian, breast, lung, prostate and potentially other cancers that depend on the same mechanism for growth. Led by Massey’s Deputy Director Steven Grossman, M.D., Ph.D., a team of scientists targeted the gene CtBP with a drug known as HIPP (2-hydroxy-imino phenylpyruvic acid) ...
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Lifeflo has developed oxygen producing small pouch/device for home care and remote patients.

Lifeflo has developed oxygen producing small pouch for home care and remote patients. FDA cleared device designed to provide oxygen at 6 Liters / Minute for 15-20 Minutes. No prescription is required and has a 3 year shelf life.  Within 60 seconds or less 99.9% oxygen is flowing.   Lifeflo™ products produce medical grade 99.9% oxygen utilizing their patent pending technology.  Each product allows to simply and affordably provide oxygen to anyone experiencing a challenging healt...
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Purdue University scientists have developed a new surgical glue that’s based on the proteins of sea mussels and other animals

Non-toxic glue modeled after adhesive proteins produced by mussels and other creatures has been found to out-perform commercially available products, pointing toward potential surgical glues to replace sutures and staples. More than 230 million major surgeries are performed worldwide each year, and over 12 million traumatic wounds are treated in the United States alone. About 60 percent of these wounds are closed using mechanical methods such as sutures and staples. “Sutures and staples have s...
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Rockefeller University Scientists use algorithm to peer through opaque brains

Trying to pinpoint signals from individual neurons within a block of brain tissue is like trying to count headlights in thick fog. A new algorithm, developed by researchers based at The Rockefeller University, brings this brain activity into focus. In research described June 26 in Nature Methods, the team, led by Rockefeller’s Alipasha Vaziri, used a light microscope-based technique to capture neural activity within a volume of mouse brain tissue at unprecedented speed. The algorithm allowed ...
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Augusta University research suggest, age and obesity conspire to damage the tiny blood vessels that feed the heart, causing heart failure

Age and obesity appear to create a perfect storm that can reduce blood flow through the tiny blood vessels that directly feed our heart muscle and put us at risk for heart failure, scientists report. They call it “aged fat” and scientists now have evidence that the inflammation created by both age and fat have an additive effect that can thicken the walls of our coronary microvasculature without any  evidence of  the classic atherosclerotic plaque that many of us associate with heart disease....
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Podimetrics has developed foot temperature monitoring pad that can help predict who will get a common diabetes and also keep track of a diabetic’s feet

Podimetrics is a company that has developed a special foot temperature monitoring pad that can keep track of a diabetic’s feet to help detect the onset of foot ulcers. The Podimetrics Mat and the rest of the company’s Remote Temperature Monitoring System allow clinicians to receive high resolution temperature scans of the soles of their patients’ feet while giving patients the convenience of doing daily tests in the convenience of the home.   Foot ulcers can have an their early wa...
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NASA Prepares for Aug. 21 Total Solar Eclipse with Live Coverage, Safety Information

For the first time in 99 years, a total solar eclipse will occur across the entire continental United States, and NASA is preparing to share this experience of a lifetime on Aug. 21. Viewers around the world will be provided a wealth of images captured before, during, and after the eclipse by 11 spacecraft, at least three NASA aircraft, more than 50 high-altitude balloons, and the astronauts aboard the International Space Station – each offering a unique vantage point for the celestial event....
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FDA approved gammaCore a non-invasive vagus nerve stimulator from electroCore to treat acute pain

electroCore, a neuroscience and technology company dedicated to improving patient outcomes through technological advancement, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released the use of gammaCore® (non-invasive vagus nerve stimulator) for the acute treatment of pain associated with episodic cluster headache in adult patients. gammaCore transmits a mild electrical stimulation to the vagus nerve through the skin, resulting in a reduction of pain. This is the first FDA product re...
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Stanford researchers develop a new soft, growing robot

Imagine rescuers searching for people in the rubble of a collapsed building. Instead of digging through the debris by hand or having dogs sniff for signs of life, they bring out a small, air-tight cylinder. They place the device at the entrance of the debris and flip a switch. From one end of the cylinder, a tendril extends into the mass of stones and dirt, like a fast-climbing vine. A camera at the tip of the tendril gives rescuers a view of the otherwise unreachable places beneath the rubble. ...
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Crime fighting security robot by knightscope

Knightscope (the K5 beta prototype) is a fully autonomous robot, used to monitor crimes in schools, businesses, and neighborhoods. Its developers stated that development was inspired by the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, and to prevent future crimes. The K5 robot is 5 feet tall, and 300 pounds. The K5 detects crime using a variety of sensors including video camera, thermal imaging sensors, a laser range finder, radar, air quality sensors and a microphone. The K5 has been developed s...
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Chinese Automaker BYD Delivers First Electric Truck to US Freight

BYD Motors Inc. is supplying 11 zero-emission battery electric trucks to SF Goodwill for use in the San Francisco region collecting and transporting donations. The 10 delivery trucks and one refuse truck will be assembled at BYD Motors’ facility in Lancaster. SF Goodwill, which serves San Francisco, San Mateo and Marin counties, will use the delivery trucks for collections and to transport donations among its stores and drop off locations and the refuse truck as a debris hauler for transpo...
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Airbus Defence and Space has designed its latest unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)

Airbus Defence and Space has designed its latest unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), SAGITTA. This new type of aircraft has been successfully tested and will enter series production. Photo courtesy of Airbus. Using a pre-programmed course, Airbus tested the unmanned jet-propelled demonstrator at its test site in Overberg, South Africa. The UAV flew completely autonomously for around seven minutes.   This was the first phase of testing, which also included extensive ground tests. Th...
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Husbands In China Can Now Rest In ‘Storage Pods’ While Wives Shop

Global Harbour mall in Shanghai, China is testing a new pilot program for men, glass pods where men can go to play video games while others can shops. https://youtu.be/KAWz2bBlDms   The pods are referred to locally as a “husband rest room”, containing a comfortable seat and a self-service computer equipment. The pods are actually in the middle of the mall with full view of passing crowd. The walls are also transparent  but it is fully enclosed, so the husbands are not disturbed fro...
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Sao Paulo Medical journal research suggest, patient mortality rate is Influenced of time elapsed from end of emergency surgery until admission to intensive care unit.

Influence of time elapsed from end of emergency surgery until admission to intensive care unit, on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) prediction and patient mortality rate The intensive care unit is the part of the hospital that is dedicated to providing a system of continuous surveillance for seriously ill patients who are potentially recoverable or at risk.1 The high-complexity features of these services and their high cost make it difficult to offer enough beds i...
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Patients whose emergency surgery is delayed are at higher risk of death

BACKGROUND: Delay of surgery for hip fracture is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, but the effects of surgical delays on mortality and resource use in the context of other emergency surgeries is poorly described. Our objective was to measure the independent association between delay of emergency surgery and in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs. METHODS: We identified all adult patients who underwent emergency noncardiac surgery between January 2012 an...
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CathVision is developing next generation non-invasive technology to guide therapy for arrhythmia

CathVision is developing non-invasive technology to guide therapy for arrhythmia. The company's product visualizes the smallest heart signals. High quality electrophysiology signals are a key component of delivering accurate therapy to complex arrhythmia. Approximately 2% of the Western population suffers from cardiac arrhythmia, and hospital-based catheter ablation procedures are directed at terminating arrhythmia. Still, a number of challenging arrhythmia suffers from unsatisfactory low eff...
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