IFAB – International Football Association Board agrees to introduce experiments with video assistant referees

A landmark decision by the International Football Association Board (The IFAB) at its 130th Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Cardiff, Wales, will pave the way for the introduction of live experiments with video assistant referees in football. In the meeting held at the St David’s Hotel and chaired by the President of the Football Association of Wales David Griffiths, also saw the most substantial revision of the Laws of the Game get the green light plus key outcomes on other agenda items inclu...
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‘The Scripps Research Institute’ researchers have identified Piezo2 channel in sensory neurons that generates a message about lung volume change, which when is lacking shows severe respiratory distress that leads to death

A protein originally discovered at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) appears to be involved in how the body controls breathing, according to a new study led by scientists at TSRI and Harvard Medical School. The study, published in Nature, shows how the Piezo2 protein, previously shown to be the principal sensor of touch and proprioception, also plays a critical role in sensing lung expansion. “The discoveries here could provide important clues on how to treat patients with respiratory dis...
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Harvard Medical School researchers have identified critical step in DNA repair for cellular aging

DNA is a precious molecule. It encodes vital information about cellular content and function. There are only two copies of each chromosome in the cell, and once the sequence is lost no replacement is possible. The irreplaceable nature of the DNA sets it apart from other cellular molecules, and makes it a critical target for age-related deterioration. To prevent DNA damage cells have evolved elaborate DNA repair machinery. Paradoxically, DNA repair can itself be subject to age-related changes ...
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Purdue University student has developed hands-free alternative for crutch for people with foot injury.

Individuals with lower leg injuries could soon be saying goodbye to traditional crutches with the development of a hands-free alternative that is more comfortable and potentially more effective. The device, developed by Purdue University graduates, could provide ergonomic and natural movement and transmit real-time recovery data to physicians. “Six and a half million people in the U.S. today use devices such as wheelchairs, walkers, crutches and canes. Traditional crutches are the most common...
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University of Alabama is developing new peptide to combat a disorder that causes heart attacks at early age

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are developing and testing a new peptide that they hope will lead to better treatment options for familial hypercholesterolemia. FH is a genetic condition that results from the body’s inability to clear low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or bad cholesterol, from the blood. This results in startlingly high cholesterol levels. There are two forms of FH: heterozygous FH (HeFH) and homozygous HoFH, which is the most serious type of FH. If untreat...
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NASA has developed a Carbon Nanotube Sensors for Gas Detection

A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures: single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), combined with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining process. This technology provides a sensor array that can accommodate different nanostructures for specific applications with the advantages of high sensitivity, low power consumption, compactness, high yield and low cost. BenefitNanotechnology based chemical sensors can provide high sensitivity, low power and low cost p...
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North Carolina State University have developed a technique that uses light to get two-dimensional (2-D) plastic sheets to curve into three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as spheres, tubes or bowls.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a technique that uses light to get two-dimensional (2-D) plastic sheets to curve into three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as spheres, tubes or bowls. The advance builds on earlier work by the same research team, which focused on self-folding 3-D structures. The key advance here is that rather than having the plastic fold along sharp lines – into polygonal shapes such as cubes or pyramids – the plastics bend and curve. Res...
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Seoul National University research demonstrated natural technique to increase egg production in chickens

A research team led by Professors Doman Kim and Tae Sub Park of the Graduate School of International Agricultural Technology found that chicken feed including naturally fermented buckwheat increases the production of eggs by over 8%. The researchers used Rhizopus – a fungus causing the group of infections referred to as zygomycosis and usually found in decaying breads, fruits, and vegetables - to ferment the buckwheat. The team found that chickens eating the buckwheat feed laid more and larger e...
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Volkswagen’s New Self Driving Electric Car – ‘Sedric’ With No Steering Wheel

Volkswagen's plans to develop fully autonomous vehicles that would offer greater comfort and convenience than current cars, while slashing the number of road deaths and truly democratizing mobility, have borne their first fruit. This is Sedric, designed to be a platform for cross-brand ideas, which will feed into subsequent concepts from the group's car brands. The biggest idea it introduces is its full "Level 5" autonomy: no human driver is required. There's no VW badge on the fron...
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Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body, and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices

A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body, and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices yet to be developed. The discoveries reported May 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences culminate years of efforts by Ada Poon, assistant professor of electrical engineering, to eliminate the bulky batteries and clumsy recharging systems that preve...
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Ohio State University have successfully mapped how brain represent 3-D information

We live in a three-dimensional world, but everything we see is first recorded on our retinas in only two dimensions. So how does the brain represent 3-D information? In a new study, researchers for the first time have shown how different parts of the brain represent an object’s location in depth compared to its 2-D location. Researchers at The Ohio State University had volunteers view simple images with 3-D glasses while they were in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner. ...
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Purdue University research will soon make it possible for doctors to be able to detect and monitor a patient’s cancer with a simple blood test

Doctors may soon be able to detect and monitor a patient’s cancer with a simple blood test, reducing or eliminating the need for more invasive procedures, according to Purdue University research. W. Andy Tao, a professor of biochemistry and member of the Purdue University Center for Cancer Research and colleagues identified a series of proteins in blood plasma that, when elevated, signify that the patient has cancer. Their findings were published in the early edition of the Proceedings of the N...
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University of Tokyo research suggest Brain has a neural region (like a metamemory) for memory evaluation and recollection.

A group of University of Tokyo researchers and their collaborators identified for the first time in monkeys the neural substrate, or functional units in the nervous system, underlying the ability, known as metamemory, that enables objective self-evaluation of memory. The group also demonstrated that the neural substrate for metamemory is distinct from that for memory recollection. Metamemory is a sophisticated mental process that requires introspective evaluation of one’s own cognitive proces...
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University of Utah research suggest religious and spiritual experiences activate the brain reward circuits

We’re just beginning to understand how the brain participates in experiences that believers interpret as spiritual, divine or transcendent,” says senior author and neuroradiologist Jeff Anderson, who also has an unpaid faculty position in the U’s bioengineering department. “In the last few years, brain imaging technologies have matured in ways that are letting us approach questions that have been around for millennia.” Specifically, the investigators set out to determine which brain networks ar...
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New Raptor XL Inflatable Platform Fishing Boat that has a Tent on it.

With the Raptor XL Platform Fishing Boat, you can stay on the water as long as you'd like. Measuring 16.4 x 16.4 feet, this platform-style fishing boat is so big, you can pitch a tent and camp in it. Unlike standard fishing boats, it comes with tent mounts (15 D-rings) that you can use to pitch an actual tent right on the boat. That way, you can sleep in the water while all your baits are cast and waiting for a bite. The Raptor Platform XL is an inflatable boat that measures a whopping 16....
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Blue Line Technology is a non-intrusive, but rigorously precise, identity-verification system using intelligent facial recognition during LIVE video surveillance

Whether you are a gas station owner concerned about armed robbery, an organization with secure spaces for drugs, arms or data systems, or a school that wants to limit who can enter, having the right security systems in place is critical. First Line’s intelligent facial recognition, video surveillance software by Blue Line Technology is a non-intrusive, but rigorously precise, identity-verification system. Every face is scanned Everyone who approaches a First Line monitored doorway is ...
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Purdue University researchers are developing software in a “haptic device” that could give people with visual impairments the ability to identify scientific images on a computer screen using their other senses.

Purdue University researchers are developing software in a “haptic device” that could give people with visual impairments the ability to identify scientific images on a computer screen using their other senses. Ting Zhang, a graduate student in the Purdue School of Industrial Engineering, is developing a system that involves a specially designed joystick attached to a computer. The joystick controls a cursor. When the cursor moves across an object on the screen, force feedback, vibrations and...
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Memorial Care Heart & Vascular Institute, California research found Amazonian tribe appears to have the best heart health in the world, living a simple existence that inadvertently provides them extraordinary protection against heart disease

The Tsimane people—a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon—have the lowest reported levels of vascular aging for any population, with coronary atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) being five times less common than in the U.S., according to a study published today in The Lancet and presented at the American College of Cardiology. Senior author of the study is Gregory S. Thomas, M.D., MPH, Medical Director, MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute, Long Beach (CA)...
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Columbia University’s research suggest taking vitamin B may play a critical role in reducing the impact of air pollution on the epigenome

New study by researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health showed that B vitamins may play a critical role in reducing the impact of air pollution on the epigenome, further demonstrating the epigenetic effects of air pollution on health. This is the first study to detail a course of research for developing interventions that prevent or minimize the adverse effects of air pollution on potential automatic markers. The results are published online in the journal PNAS. An e...
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University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, in Scotland research study found that sedentary behaviors begin to set in shortly after the ripe old age of 7.

There is a widely held and influential view that physical activity begins to decline at adolescence. This study aimed to identify the timing of changes in physical activity during childhood and adolescence. John Reilly from the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, in Scotland research study found that sedentary behaviors begin to set in shortly after the ripe old age of 7. Longitudinal cohort study (Gateshead Millennium Study) with eight years of follow-up, from Northeast England. Cohort me...
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e-Go is a lightweight carbon fiber single seat aircraft powered by a compact ‘wankel’ rotary engine and has removable canard and wings so it can be parked in your garage.

e-Go is a remarkably light single seat aircraft. At the cutting edge of design and material innovation, it defines a new category of leisure aviation. We call it the “fun flying machine”. Operating to the north of Cambridge, e-Go aeroplanes is creating the striking, new, very lightweight e-Go aircraft. It will cost dramatically less to fly than traditional aircraft and is a design-led product for discerning pilots who relish new experiences. It uses novel technologies for performance yet achi...
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Stanford University has developed novel method to Label-Free Detection of Chemical Toxins in Tap Water by leveraging Fluorescent Carrier Ampholytes Assay.

New novel method for fluorescence-based indirect detection of analytes and demonstrate its use for label-free detection of chemical toxins in a hand-held device. Environmental monitoring efforts, and water quality assessment in particular, would benefit from widely available and inexpensive chemical assays and sensor technologies.1 Gas and liquid chromatography methods, and their coupling to mass spectrometry, currently are standard methods suggested by the United States Environmental Protect...
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Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is instituting new Lifelong Learning Machines (L2M) program that seeks to develop the foundations for systems that might someday “learn” in much the way biological organisms do

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense responsible for the development of emerging technologies for use by the military. DARPA was created in February 1958 as the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Its purpose was to formulate and execute research and development projects to expand the frontiers of technology and science, with the aim to reach beyond immediate military requirements. DARPA...
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IOT -Internet Of Things, training courses

Courses for Beginning With Internet of Things 1Build Your Own Internet of Things Created by UC San Diego and Qualcomm In this course included are the concepts behind Internet of Things services and products. You will be working with sensors, actuators, processors and communication protocols to understand and develop skills that will help you in deploying real life IoT applications. There are both theory and lab sections included in this course. Courses Included are: Internet o...
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Makey Makey is an invention kit for school kids that makes anything into a ‘key’. (real objects that turn into touchpads)

Makey Makey is an invention kit developed by Jay Silver and Eric Rosenbaum, Makey Makey turns every object into a touchpad key. The real magic starts when it's used with real objects that turn into touchpads to operate machines which usually may have traditionally required a computer and an access to internet. Makey Makey started out as a project that was initiated by two students at MIT Media Lab under the advisorship of Mitch Resnick and is an academic and artistic project. Now it's both a ...
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Eindhoven University of Technology have developed wireless network based on harmless infrared rays that is 100 times faster and it never overloads

Eindhoven University of Technology have developed a wireless network based on harmless infrared rays. Slow wi-fi is a source of irritation that nearly everyone experiences. Wireless devices in the home consume ever more data, and it’s only growing, and congesting the wi-fi network. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have come up with a surprising solution: a wireless network based on harmless infrared rays. The capacity is not only huge (more than 40Gbit/s per ray) but also the...
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Lotus Elise Sport 220 super car that weighs only 68kg and offers 217 hp / 250 Nm of torque, 1.8-litre supercharged engine

Retaining the elements that have always kept the Elise ahead of rivals, the Elise Sport 220 is built around an extruded and bonded aluminium chassis which is both tremendously strong and torsionally stiff - weighing just 68 kg. The new Elise Sport 220 benefits from a range of improvements, which includes a 10 kg mass reduction thanks to a number of new components. Changes to the body including a redesigned lightweight front clam panel, with wider apertures and mesh pattern grille provide ...
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Lockheed Martin’s Robert Afzal and team have developed laser weapon systems, taking the page from star wars and making it real

Science reality has caught up with science fiction. Lockheed Martin is showing that laser weapon systems can turn up the heat and stop land, air or sea targets in their path. And, they can be compact enough and power efficient enough for tactical platforms on the move, providing nearly unlimited “bullets” with speed-of-light response. Lockheed Martin is moving at light speed to position these capable systems for success on the battlefield. They have developed innovative fiber lasers, sophisti...
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‘NanoCar’ is a molecule design with the idea that it can transport themselves through the bloodstream in order to deliver drugs to previously unreachable locations in the human body with a high degree of accuracy

The nanocar is a molecule designed in 2005 at Rice University by a group headed by Professor James Tour. The molecule consists of an H-shaped 'chassis' with fullerene groups attached at the four corners to act as wheels. According to Professor Tour - Rice University, this development is a watershed in so far as constructing successfully a nanocar represents the first step toward molecular manufacturing. Professor Tour avers: “It’s the beginning of learning how to manipulate things at the nano...
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Researchers at Harvard and MIT have developed a drug cocktail that unlocks potential to regrow inner-ear ‘hair’ cells and improve hearing

One of the most amazing functional groups in the body is the auditory system. We often take for granted the gift of hearing, and can’t imagine what life would be like without the ability to communicate with others or to enjoy music and all the other sounds in our environment. However, in order to enable us to hear and interpret those sounds, there are an enormous number of tasks that the auditory system must perform, as we will see. It far surpasses any existing sound reproduction system around....
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