Modification of plant hormone levels and signaling as a tool in plant biotechnology.

Plant hormones are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in extremely low concentrations. There are five general classes of hormones: auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, ethylene Plant hormones are signal molecules, present in trace quantities, that act as major regulators of plant growth and development. They are involved in a wide range of processes such as elongation, flowering, root formation and vascular differentiation. For many years, agriculturists have applied hormon...
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Machine learning – Next new level of computer evolution

Machine learning is the subfield of computer science that, according to Arthur Samuel, gives "computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed Machine learning is the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed. In the past decade, machine learning has given us self-driving cars, practical speech recognition, effective web search, and a vastly improved understanding of the human genome. There is little doubt that Machine Learning (ML) and Artif...
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Impossible Burger—a meatless patty made from plants, including wheat and potato protein

 It looks like a burger, it tastes like a burger but it is not beef. It's the Impossible Burger. When put on the grill, the patty sizzles. As it cooks, the unmistakeable smell of beef wafts through the air. After it's cooked, plated and served to the customer, the first bite is juicy. It looks like a burger, it tastes like a burger but it is not beef. It's the Impossible Burger The burger contains protein from wheat and potato, coconut oil and heme, an iron-containing compound. Soy ...
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University at Buffalo Scientists use magnetic fields to remotely stimulate brain and control body movements

Scientists use magnetic fields to remotely stimulate brain — and control body movements Scientists have used magnetic nanoparticles to stimulate neurons deep in the brain to evoke body movements of mice. This image shows a section of a mouse brain with injected magnetic nanoparticles (colored red) covering targeted cells in the striatum. Credit: Munshi et al, eLife The minimally invasive technique could lead to advances in mapping the brain and treating neurological dise...
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‘SoClean’ CPAP sanitizer that is activated by oxygen (ozone or O3) to kill 99% of the mold, bacteria and viruses

The world's first automated CPAP cleaner and sanitizer The SoClean 2 is a quick and easy daily CPAP sanitizer. It uses activated oxygen (ozone or O3) to kill 99% of the mold, bacteria and viruses SoClean allows easier, more effective way to clean CPAP machine equipment. SoClean kills 99.9% of CPAP germs and bacteria in your mask, hose and reservoir with no disassembly, no water, and no chemicals in order to enhance your home CPAP experience. https://youtu.be/DSr4qls9vpo Just a drop...
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UNIVERSITY OF UTAH RESEARCHERS DEVELOP FASTER, MORE ACCURATE TEST FOR LIVER CANCER THAT CAN BE ADMINISTERED ANYWHERE

It’s estimated that about 788,000 people worldwide died of liver cancer in 2015, the second-leading cause of cancer deaths, according to the latest statistics from the World Health Organization. One of the major challenges in combatting this disease is detecting it early because symptoms often don’t appear until later stages. But a team of researchers led by University of Utah chemical engineering and chemistry professor Marc Porter and U surgeon and professor Courtney Scaife has developed a ...
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FDA cleared Xstat30 wound dressing, an expandable, multi-sponge dressing used to Stop Gun and Knife Wounds in Arms and Legs

U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared the use of the XSTAT 30 wound dressing, an expandable, multi-sponge dressing used to control severe, life-threatening bleeding from wounds in areas that a tourniquet cannot be placed (such as the groin or armpit) in battlefield and civilian trauma settings. The clearance expands the device’s indication from use by the military only to use in adults and adolescents in the general population. Early control of severe bleeding may prevent shock and may be...
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UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA OKANAGAN CAMPUS research suggest women outlast men during dynamic muscle exercises

Research shows women outlast men during dynamic muscle exercises UBC Assistant Professor Brian Dalton. In the battle of the sexes, new UBC research suggests that men may be stronger physically but women have much greater muscle endurance than their male counterparts. In a new study from UBC’s Okanagan campus, researchers in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences have found that women are considerably less exhausted after natural, dynamic muscle exercises than men of similar ag...
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AHA, one of Iceland’s largest eCommerce companies, partnered with Flytrex to expand its’ delivery bandwidth and find new, efficient ways to deliver goods to customers around the city of Reykjavik.

Drone delivery company Flytrex  partnered with AHA, Iceland's largest online marketplace, to provide delivery by drone in Reykjavik.The partnership creates the world's "first operational on-demand urban drone delivery service. https://youtu.be/lwmgAd2TTIY " Using drones, Reykjavik's food and consumer goods delivery industry will reduce costs by increasing efficiency, reducing energy consumption and streamlining delivery logistics. The Icelandic Transport Authority approved the companies...
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Northwestern Medicine scientists and collaborators at Purdue University Research Suggest Fatty Acids May Help Target Ovarian Cancer

In a recent publication, Northwestern Medicine scientists and collaborators at Purdue University proposed a new marker to identify ovarian cancer stem cells, which may lead to the development of a new class of drugs that could target those cells for eradication. The study, published in Cell Stem Cell, proposes a method for targeting cancer stem cells through metabolic markers. While cancer stem cells are a small population of all cancer cells, they have the ability to initiate tumors and have...
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Yale University research suggest loss of arctic sea ice impacting atlantic ocean water circulation system

Arctic sea ice is not merely a passive responder to the climate changes occurring around the world, according to new research. Scientists at Yale University and the University of Southampton say the ongoing Arctic ice loss can play an active role in altering one of the planet’s largest water circulation systems: the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). AMOC has a lower limb of dense, cold water that flows south from the north Atlantic, and an upper limb of warm, salty wa...
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Scientists from DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discovered a family of synthetic polymers that self-assemble into nanotubes with consistent diameters

When you bring a box home from the furniture store, you don't expect the screws, slats, and other pieces to magically converge into a bed or table. Yet this self-assembly occurs every day in nature. Nothing tells atoms to link together; nothing tells DNA how to form. Living materials contain the very instructions and ability to become a larger whole. "Self-assembly is the universal process by which very complex structures are put together in nature. They are dynamic, they are multi-functional...
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Home Med Station medications organizing and aiding people in maintaining compliance in their medication schedule

The Home Med Station is the most convenient method for organizing and identifying a large number of regularly scheduled medications. By week, it indicates the time to take medications in four simple intervals daily. It has a helpful medicine sorting area, and there is even an area for weekly patient communications that can store 52 weeks of communication sheets. The patented features in the Home Med Station are designed to aid people in maintaining compliance in their medication schedule. It ha...
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piezoelectric sensor is a device that uses the piezoelectric effect, to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain, or force by converting them to an electrical charge

A piezoelectric sensor is a device that uses the piezoelectric effect, to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain, or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The prefix piezo- is Greek for 'press' or 'squeeze'. A proper knowledge of the interaction between human physiology and daily living environmental conditions is essential to establish a connection between an individual’s lifestyle and his/her health status. Understanding these connections will give insight ...
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Hexoskin smart shirt is capable of accurately tracking an array of biometric data. (cardiac, respiratory, sleep and activity data)

 Hexoskin Smart Shirts are a comfortable new way to monitor precise cardiac, respiratory, sleep and activity data. People with cardiovascular disease with a high cardiovascular risk (due to the presence of one or more risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia or already established disease) need early detection and management using counseling and medicines, as appropriate. Hexoskin is an efficient and accurate solution to collect quantitative data about patients, every day,...
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High Dietary Energy Density (DED) foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status

Dietary energy density (DED) is defined as the amount of available energy per unit of weight in the diet. It is generally expressed as kJ/g. Experimental studies in human subjects and a recent systematic review have shown that the consumption of high-energy-dense diets may lead to increased energy intake and weight gain, and evidence has been accumulating for an association between lower DED and better nutritional quality of the diet. In Swedish children and teenagers, it was found that low-e...
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Total Solar Eclipse Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun.

Eclipse: Who? What? Where? When? and How? Total Solar Eclipse On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totalitycan see one of nature’s most awe-inspiring sights - a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Observers outside this path will s...
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Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a new technique using high-frequency alternating magnetic fields to heat artificial joints in the body

A short exposure to an alternating magnetic field might someday replace multiple surgeries and weeks of IV antibiotics as treatment for stubborn infections on artificial joints, new research suggests. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have shown that high-frequency alternating magnetic fields – the same principle used in induction cooktops – can be used to destroy bacteria that are encased in a slimy “biofilm” growing on a metal surface. The biofilm is a collection of microorganis...
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Kennedy Scientists Developing Technology to Remove Martian Dust

NASA's Journey to Mars requires cutting-edge technologies to solve the problems explorers will face on the Red Planet. Scientists at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida are developing some of the needed solutions. Dr. Carlos Calle, lead scientist in the center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory, and Jay Phillips, a research physicist working there, are developing an electrostatic precipitator to help solve the dust problem. "Commodities such as oxygen water and me...
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Boston Children’s Hospital have found a new way to non-invasively relieve pain at local sites in the body using ultrasound

According to the CDC, 91 people die from opioid overdoses every day in the U.S. Here in Massachusetts, the state has an opioid-related death rate that is more than twice the national average. “Opioid abuse is a growing problem in healthcare,” says Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, a senior associate in critical care medicine at Boston Children’s and professor of anesthesiology at Harvard Medical School. Now, Kohane and other scientists who are developing triggerable drug delivery systems at Bost...
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North Carolina State University Spheroid Stem Cell Production Sows Hope for IPF (Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis)Treatment

In a small pilot study, researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a rapid, simple way to generate large numbers of lung stem cells for use in disease treatment. This method of harvesting and growing a patient’s own lung stem cells shows promise in mice for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and could one day provide human IPF sufferers with an effective, less invasive method of treatment for their disease. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic ir...
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Hover Camera Passport – Self-Flying Camera

The Hover Camera Passport, a drone designed for taking selfies. Hover Camera Passport is an autonomous self-flying camera that follows you and records your travel moments in 13MP photos and 4K video. You can now buy the flying camera today and ask for an in-store demonstration at select Apple stores. Passport is a flying camera in a class of its own, that’s portable, safe, truly easy-to-fly right out of the box, and lightweight at just 242 grams (0.55 pounds). Take it on your wanderlust so...
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University of Chicago genetically modified skin cells to produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) protein that is beneficial in diabetes and obesity

A research team based at the University of Chicago has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy and demonstrated how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat many human diseases. In the August 3, 2017 issue of the journal Cell Stem Cell, the researchers provide “proof-of-concept.” They describe gene-therapy administered through skin transplants to treat two related and extremely common human ailments: type-2 diabetes a...
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Drug developed at the University of Rochester Medical Center protected mice from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

A drug developed at the University of Rochester Medical Center protected mice from one of the many ills of our cheeseburger and milkshake-laden Western diet – non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In a study out today in the journal JCI Insights, scientists report that a drug called “URMC-099” reversed liver inflammation, injury and scarring in animals fed a diet high in fat, sugar and cholesterol. The diet was designed to replicate the Western fast food diet and recreate the features of non-alc...
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DIABETES SENTRY is a non-invasive, wearable electronic device which sounds an alarm when blood glucose threshold readings have been reached

The DIABETES SENTRY is an affordable, non-invasive, wearable electronic device which sounds an alarm while being worn on the wrist, ankle, or bicep of persons with diabetes whose blood glucose has begun to trend downward. In 90% of the cases, persons with diabetes show one or both of two hallmark symptoms of trending toward hypoglycemia, increased perspiration and a drop in skin temperature. This patient base is considered to be symptomatic. The 10% of individuals with diabetes that do NOT...
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Tesla battery researcher unveils new chemistry to increase lifecycle at high voltage

Historical data from Tesla’s current battery packs show about 5% capacity degradation after 50,000 miles (80,000 km) and the capacity levels off for about 150,000 more miles before hitting 90% capacity. Those are already pretty good results, but Tesla aims to do better with Jeff Dahn, a renowned battery researcher and the leader of Tesla’s research partnership through his battery-research group at Dalhousie University. The scientist and his team recently unveiled their latest research on a...
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Soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients, opening new approaches to gait re-training and rehabilitation

soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients, opening new approaches to gait re-training and rehabilitation Upright walking on two legs is a defining trait in humans, enabling them to move very efficiently throughout their environment. This can all change in the blink of an eye when a stroke occurs. In about 80% of patients post-stroke, it is typical that one limb loses its ability to function normally — a clinical phenomenon called hemiparesis. And even patients ...
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KARLSRUHER INSTITUT FÜR TECHNOLOGIE (KIT) Solar glasses

These Solar Glasses with lens-fitted semitransparent organic solar cells supply two sensors and electronics in the temples with electric power. Source: Photo: KIT Organic solar cells are flexible, transparent, and light-weight - and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colors. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realized with conventional silicon solar cells. In the Energy Technology journal, researchers from KIT now prese...
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Salk Institute, Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and Korea’s Institute for Basic Science research scientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing.

EARLY GENE-EDITING SUCCESS HOLDS PROMISE FOR PREVENTING INHERITED DISEASES Scientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos Scientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos Scientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing. The technique, which uses the CRISPR-Cas9 system, corrected the mutation for a heart condition at the earliest stage of ...
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NASA Plant Researchers Explore Production Of Food Crops In Space

NASA plant physiologist Ray Wheeler, Ph.D., and fictional astronaut Mark Watney from the movie "The Martian" have something in common — they are both botanists. But that's where the similarities end. While Watney is a movie character who gets stranded on Mars, Wheeler is the lead for Advanced Life Support Research activities in the Exploration Research and Technology Program at Kennedy Space Center, working on real plant research. "The Martian movie and book conveyed a lot of issues regarding...
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