George Mason University’s College of Health and Human Services research suggest, prunes may prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women

If you need yet another reason to increase your intake of nutrient-rich fruits, here’s one. Consuming four to five prunes each day may help prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women, according to a manuscript released this month by Taylor C. Wallace, a professor in George Mason University’s College of Health and Human Services. The beneficial effects of dried plums on bone health could relate to the phenolics, a type of antioxidant, found in fruits, Wallace said. A handful of small clinic...
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Augusta University research suggest, pain reliever pentazocine may help relieve the vision damage of glaucoma

The tip of our optic nerve is typically the first place injured by glaucoma. Now researchers want to know if the powerful pain medicine (+)-pentazocine can help avoid the damage. Their focus is star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes that normally nourish and protect the neurons in the eye, called retinal ganglion cells, at the juncture where the optic nerve sends visual information to the brain so we can see. Glaucoma appears to change the relationship between these two brain cell types...
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GE and Partners will spend the next 10 years creating artificial intelligence software for Hospital for better care

GE and Partners, which owns Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, will spend the next 10 years creating artificial intelligence software that can detect how severe a stroke is and identify tumors in medical images. We have more and more information, and the information comes at our clinicians in a way that can be unmanageable," said David Torchiana, CEO of Partners HealthCare. GE and Partners, which owns Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospita...
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Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is used from healing of injured tendons, ligaments, muscles, joints and hair loss

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentrate of platelet-rich plasma protein derived from whole blood, centrifuged to removed red blood cells. It has a greater concentration of growth factors than whole blood, and has been used to encourage a brisk healing response across several specialties, in particular dentistry, orthopedics and dermatology. As a concentrated source of blood plasma and autologous conditioned plasma, PRP contains several different growth factors and other cytokines that can s...
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Researchers may now be able to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease Using Saliva’s 1H NMR-Based Metabolomics.

Investigators found salivary molecules hold promise as reliable diagnostic biomarkers. The study exemplifies the quest by scientists to combat Alzheimer’s disease, a degenerative brain disorder with no cure and few reliable diagnostic tests. In the United States, Alzheimer’s is a health epidemic affecting more than 5 million Americans. Investigators seek to develop valid and reliable biomarkers, diagnosing the disease in its earliest stages before brain damage occurs and dementia begins. R...
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NILE Proximal Fixation Spinal System can help overcome complex deformity cases and has now received FDA approval

NILE Proximal Fixation Spinal System helps overcome complex deformity cases by supporting alternative Fixation Spinal System using non-pedicle based fixation technology. NILE Proximal Fixation Spinal System received FDA approval Bone fixation cerclage, acts as a bone anchor for temporary stabilization, or used in conjunction with other medical implants of similar metals when wiring is needed, during development of a spinal fusion. Wrapped around a portion of the sublaminar, posterior sp...
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University of Illinois, researchers have developed a simple, disposable sensor for detecting hazardous uranium ions

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a simple, disposable sensor for detecting hazardous uranium ions, with sensitivity that rivals the performance of much more sophisticated laboratory instruments.   The sensor provides a fast, on-site test for assessing uranium contamination in the environment, and the effectiveness of remediation strategies, said Yi Lu, a chemistry professor at Illinois and senior author of a paper accepted for publication in...
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Universidad Carlos III Spain has developed technology which compiles all the subtitles of television channels and integrates the software to make it compatible with different Braille lines for visually impaired to be able to “watch” TV without intermediaries

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Telefónica and FASOCIDE (the Spanish acronym for the Federation of Deaf-Blind Persons Associations) has developed PervasiveSUB technology, ground-breaking software which allows deaf-blind persons to receive and enjoy television content without intermediaries at the same time as the people around them. PervasiveSUB compiles all the subtitles of television channels and sends them to a central server which forwards them to smartphone...
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Rockefeller University have discovered tantalizing clues about the origins of our ability to understand what other people are thinking

Working with rhesus monkeys, researchers have identified a brain network dedicated to processing social interaction. Scientists call our ability to understand another person’s thoughts—to intuit their desires, read their intentions, and predict their behavior—theory of mind. It’s an essential human trait, one that is crucial to effective social interaction. But where did it come from? Working with rhesus macaque monkeys, researchers in Winrich Freiwald’s Laboratory of Neural Systems ...
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Northwestern University Research Suggest Fatty Acids May Help Target Ovarian Cancer

In a recent publication, Northwestern Medicine scientists and collaborators at Purdue University proposed a new marker to identify ovarian cancer stem cells, which may lead to the development of a new class of drugs that could target those cells for eradication. The study, published in Cell Stem Cell, proposes a method for targeting cancer stem cells through metabolic markers. While cancer stem cells are a small population of all cancer cells, they have the ability to initiate tumors and have...
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‘Yara Birkeland’ will be first ever zero emission, autonomous ship

Vessel 'Yara Birkeland' will be the world’s first fully electric and autonomous container ship, with zero emissions. With this vessel, Yara will reduce diesel-powered truck haulage by 40,000 journeys a year. Yara Birkeland will initially operate as a manned vessel, moving to remote operation in 2019 and expected to be capable of performing fully autonomous operations from 2020. The new zero-emission vessel will be a game-changer for global maritime transport contributing to meet the UN sustai...
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Genetics of Aggressive Behavior

Genetic-developmental theory states that individual differences in a continuous phenotype result from the action of a large number of genes, each exerting an effect that works with environmental factors to produce the trait. This type of trait is influenced by multiple factors making it more complex and difficult to study than a simple Mendelian trait (one gene for one phenotype). Aggression, as well as other behavioral traits, is studied genetically based on its heritability through gener...
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Small-animal whole-body photoacoustic tomography

Multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) is an imaging technology that generates high-resolution optical images in scattering media, including biological tissues. MSOT illuminates tissue with light of transient energy, typically light pulses lasting 1-100 nanoseconds. The tissue absorbs the light pulses, and as a result undergoes thermo-elastic expansion, a phenomenon known as the optoacoustic or photoacoustic effect. This expansion gives rise to ultrasound waves (photoechoes) that are d...
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Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM) is having its annual meeting on June 25 – 29 2017

The Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM) is the primary international organization dedicated to using neuroimaging to discover the organization of the human brain. OHBM is having its annual meeting on June 25 - 29 2017 Key few topic that will be covered include : Network effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on the prefrontal cortex Structural Imaging Evaluation of Subcallosal Cingulate DBS for Treatment-Resistant Depression Structural network architecture predi...
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Lacto Pharma New Zealand is looking to include medicine as part of an ice cream. Wouldn’t it be nice if all drugs came in the form of ice cream?

LactoPharma, a New Zealand-based pharmaceutical company, devotes its research to finding medically valuable biologically active compounds in milk. In itself, that’d be a cool enough line of research, but they’ve outdone themselves with their latest, experimental delivery system: putting biomedicine in ice cream. Development of the ice cream, named ReCharge, began 8 years ago with the formation of LactoPharma, a collaborative research venture between the University of Auckland, the New Zealand...
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Karolinska Institute in Stockholm research suggest Sleep Deprivation can have social, physical and mental impacts

We’ve always known that sleep is good for your brain, but new research from the University of Rochester provides the first direct evidence for why your brain cells need you to sleep (and sleep the right way—more on that later). The study found that when you sleep your brain removes toxic proteins from its neurons that are by-products of neural activity when you’re awake. Unfortunately, your brain can remove them adequately only while you’re asleep. So when you don’t get enough sleep, the toxic p...
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École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland has developed smart exoskeleton that recognizes the loss of balance and prevents falling

First smart exoskeleton that recognizes the loss of balance – and prevents falling – has been developed by researchers at Scuola Sant’Anna in Italy, EPFL in Switzerland, and tested at the Rehabilitation Center “Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi” in Florence. The first smart exoskeleton that  recognizes the loss of balance – and prevents falling – has been developed by researchers in at Scuola Sant’Anna in Italy, EPFL in Switzerland, and tested at the Rehabilitation Center “Fondazione Don Car...
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Pohang University of Science and Technology Research Suggest ‘Decorin’ can be the new Glue-Like Substance that could Be The Key to Healing Wounds Without Scars

Skin scarring after deep dermal injuries is a major clinical problem due to the current therapies limited to established scars with poor understanding of healing mechanisms. From investigation of aberrations within the extracellular matrix involved in pathophysiologic scarring, it was revealed that one of the main factors responsible for impaired healing is abnormal collagen reorganization. Here, inspired by the fundamental roles of decorin, a collagen-targeting proteoglycan, in collagen remodel...
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University of Tokyo research findings will now allow development of more effective mucosal vaccines, immunizing agents, that can be administered orally or through the nose rather then current injectable type of vaccines.

A research group at the University of Tokyo has identified in a study with mice a protein directly linked to the M cells' function to capture antigens around intestinal and other mucous membrane surfaces. Manipulating the protein, allograft inflammatory factor 1 (Aif1), holds promise of contributing to the development of more effective mucosal vaccines—immunizing agents, administered orally or through the nose, that enter the body via the mucous membrane—as an alternative to the conventional inj...
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Presspart and Cohero Health have developed eMDI (embedded and connected metered dose inhaler) enabling real-time monitoring of medication use and symptom flare-ups

H&T Presspart and Cohero Health have developed intuitive, fully-embedded and connected metered dose inhaler (eMDI) aimed at improving adherence and enabling continually optimized care of patients with asthma and COPD. It is the only eMDI integrated seamlessly with BreatheSmart from Cohero Health, a comprehensive respiratory disease management platform that uniquely enables tracking of both controller and rescue medications, along with clinically accurate lung function measurement, in real-ti...
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UNSW Sydney research suggest bad moods are good for you, the surprising benefits of sadness

Homo sapiens is a very moody species. Even though sadness and bad moods have always been part of the human experience, we now live in an age that ignores or devalues these feelings. The Conversation In our culture, normal human emotions like temporary sadness are often treated as disorders. Manipulative advertising, marketing and self-help industries claim happiness should be ours for the asking. Yet bad moods remain an essential part of the normal range of moods we regularly experience. D...
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MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE OF MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY AND GENETICS research found a gene for brain size is only found in humans

A gene for brain size – only found in humans   This picture shows a cerebral cortex of an embryonic mouse. The cell nuclei are marked in blue and the deep-layer neurons in red. The human-specific gene ARHGAP11B was selectively expressed in the right half of the brain, which is visible by the folding of the neocortical surface. © MPI f. Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics Following the traces of evolution: Max Planck Researchers find a key to the reproduction of brain stem cells Abo...
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Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics research suggest, for successful organ formation, it is very important that cells generate unique shapes and architecture from which these organs develop.

For successful organ formation, it is very important that cells generate unique shapes and architecture from which these organs develop. Also during the development of the vertebrate eye, cells need to actively migrate to the correct locations to generate the right tissue shape. The lab of Caren Norden at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) showed that such cell movements are crucial already at early developmental stages. If cells do not reach the right plac...
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University of Delaware found that kids who are bullied in fifth grade often suffer from depression and begin using alcohol and other substances

When it comes to understanding bullying, "we make a lot of assumptions that aren't based on data," says UD psychologist Julie Hubbard, whose scholarship aims to build a stronger empirical foundation that could lead to new and more successful evidence-based programs for bullying. Although school-based bullying prevention programs already exist, findings suggest they are not particularly effective. Thus, Hubbard, an associate professor of psychology, believes that more basic research is needed ...
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SISSA research has narrowed down the root cause of weight gain after implant

It was already known that people affected by Parkinson’s disease, when subjected to deep brain stimulation, gained weight, but it was less clear why that was so. Thanks to new research by Trieste’s SISSA, it has been realized that the weight gain after implant has a multifactorial origin. The study, published on the scientific journal Cortex, monitored for the first time a group of patients before and after the intervention, assessing cognitive, psychological and behavioural aspects. The results...
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University of Örebro, Sweden research suggests, a brisk walk instead of sitting down – just ten minutes a day makes a difference

It is not the amount of time spent sitting still that matters. Instead it is the extent of physical activity that is essential in reducing the risk of elderly women developing cardiovascular disease, as shown in a new Örebro study published in PLOS ONE. "We have studied women over 65 as they are among the least active groups of the population, at the same time as they run a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease," says Fawzi Kadi, Professor at Örebro University. A brisk walk instead ...
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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER AT SAN ANTONIO researchers increased the types of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin and were able to successfully cure diabetes in mice without side effects

Potential cure for Type 1 diabetes looms on the horizon in San Antonio, and the novel approach would also allow Type 2 diabetics to stop insulin shots. The discovery, made at The University of Texas Health Science Center, now called UT Health San Antonio, increases the types of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin. UT Health San Antonio researchers have a goal to reach human clinical trials in three years, but to do so they must first test the strategy in large-animal studies, which will ...
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Washington University’s Office of Technology Management Research on mice and patients suggests biomarker could predict vision loss

Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, most often is diagnosed during a routine eye exam. Over time, elevated pressure inside the eye damages the optic nerve, leading to vision loss. Unfortunately, there’s no way to accurately predict which patients might lose vision most rapidly. Now, studying mice, rats and fluid removed from the eyes of patients with glaucoma, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a marker of damage to cells in the ...
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University of California research suggest early childhood trauma could be influencing how the microbes in our gut interact with our brains as we grow, demonstrating a two-way street between the development of our nervous system and the microscopic residents of our digestive system.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. Visceral hypersensitivity is believed to be a key underlying mechanism that causes pain. There is evidence that interactions within the brain and gut axis (BGA) that involves both, the afferent-ascending and the efferent-descending pathways as well as the somatosensory cortex, insula, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus are deranged in IBS showing both the activation and inactivation. ...
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University in China researcher is employing HFIR to explore the mysterious world of quantum spin

Jie Ma, a professor from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, is using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s High Flux Isotope Reactor to discover a three-dimensional image of the magnetic lattice of an oxide material (Ba2CoTeO6) containing quantum properties that could provide new insight into how electron “spins” can improve data processing and storage in computers. In condensed matter physics, quantum spin liquid is a state that can be achieved in a system of interacting quantum s...
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