Stanford researchers develop a new soft, growing robot

Imagine rescuers searching for people in the rubble of a collapsed building. Instead of digging through the debris by hand or having dogs sniff for signs of life, they bring out a small, air-tight cylinder. They place the device at the entrance of the debris and flip a switch. From one end of the cylinder, a tendril extends into the mass of stones and dirt, like a fast-climbing vine. A camera at the tip of the tendril gives rescuers a view of the otherwise unreachable places beneath the rubble. ...
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Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and Virginia Tech research study finds common household chemicals are responsible for diminished reproduction in mice

Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and Virginia Tech researchers who were using a disinfectant when handling mice have discovered that two active ingredients in it cause declines in mouse reproduction. Although the chemicals responsible for the declines are common in household cleaning products and disinfectants used in medical and food preparation settings, including hand sanitizers, academic scientists have never published a rigorous study, until now, on their safety or toxicity...
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University of Notre Dame have found that exposure to just 10 minutes of light at night suppresses biting and manipulates flight behavior in the Anopheles gambiae mosquito.

Scientists at the University of Notre Dame have found that exposure to just 10 minutes of light at night suppresses biting and manipulates flight behavior in the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, the major vector for transmission of malaria in Africa, according to new research published in the journal Parasites and Vectors. Critical behaviors exhibited by the species, such as feeding, egg laying and flying, are time-of-day specific, including a greater propensity for nighttime biting. A recent repo...
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‘IRISBOND’ is building solutions to allow controlling robots and systems using your eyes

  IRISBOND emerges from a close collaboration with the VICOMTECH Foundation, a member of the IK4 Research Alliance. Leading one of its applied research lines in artificial vision, VICOMTECH-IK4 develops a system based on the Eye Tracking principle, permitting accurate computer control by eye movement. Its direct application in the world of disability, and more specifically for people with reduced mobility, is the starting point for a course that purports to explore new developments in fa...
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3D cell culture is an artificially-created environment in which biological cells are permitted to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions

3D cell culture is an artificially-created environment in which biological cells are permitted to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions. Unlike 2D environments (e.g. a petri dish), a 3D cell culture allows cells in vitro to grow in all directions, similar to how they would in vivo. These three-dimensional cultures are usually grown in bioreactors, small capsules in which the cells can grow into spheroids, or 3D cell colonies. Approximately 300 spheroids are usually cul...
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UNIVERSITAT ROVIRA research suggest Obesity alters the relationship between a biomarker of iron levels and the incidence of type 2 diabetes

Obesity alters the relationship between a biomarker of iron levels and the incidence of type 2 diabetes The association between levels of a biomarker known as the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a population with high cardiovascular risk is conditioned by the presence of absence of obesity Whereas in non-obese people, high levels of the soluble transferrin receptor are associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, in obese people t...
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University of Maryland Medical Center research suggest flax seeds provide nutrients and also health benefits to reduce the risk of chronic diseases

Flaxseed is emerging as an important functional food ingredient because of its rich contents of α-linolenic acid (ALA, omega-3 fatty acid), lignans, and fiber. Flaxseed oil, fibers and flax lignans have potential health benefits such as in reduction of cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, autoimmune and neurological disorders. Flax protein helps in the prevention and treatment of heart disease and in supporting the immune system. As a functional ...
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DARPA aims to lay groundwork for the next era of world-changing electronics and microsystems

The Department of Defense’s proposed FY 2018 budget includes a $75 million allocation for DARPA in support of a new, public-private “electronics resurgence” initiative. The initiative seeks to undergird a new era of electronics in which advances in performance will be catalyzed not just by continued component miniaturization but also by radically new microsystem materials, designs, and architectures. The new funds will supplement the Agency’s FY 2018 R&D portfolio in electronics, photonics, ...
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University of Tokyo have demonstrated that it is possible to exchange a quantum bit, the minimum unit of information used by quantum computers, between a superconducting quantum-bit circuit and a quantum in a magnet called a magnon.

Researchers in the University of Tokyo have demonstrated that it is possible to exchange a quantum bit, the minimum unit of information used by quantum computers, between a superconducting quantum-bit circuit and a quantum in a magnet called a magnon. This result is expected to contribute to the development of quantum interfaces and quantum repeaters. Magnets, often used in our daily life, exert a magnetic force produced by a large number of microscopic magnets – the spins of individual elect...
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‘ FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg’ has invited open challenge to researchers to submit a walking-visualization-tool of gait sequences based on given inertial sensor-based gait recordings acquired using intelligent engineering technology

What is this challenge about? IMAGINE - Innovative Medical Application on Gait Visualization using Intelligent Engineering The challenge asks researchers to submit a walking-visualization-tool of gait sequences based on given inertial sensor-based gait recordings acquired using intelligent engineering technology, which was developed at FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg. Seeing is believing: Doctors want to see how the patient was walking - even if they cannot see the patient. Your innovative visualiza...
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Georgia State University have rewired the neural circuit of one species and given it the connections of another species to test a hypothesis about the evolution of neural circuits and behavior.

Scientists at Georgia State University have rewired the neural circuit of one species and given it the connections of another species to test a hypothesis about the evolution of neural circuits and behavior. Neurons are connected to each other to form networks that underlie behaviors. Drs. Akira Sakurai and Paul Katz of Georgia State’s Neuroscience Institute study the brains of sea slugs, more specifically nudibranchs, which have large neurons that form simple circuits and produce simple beha...
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Brookhaven National Laboratory Scientists Design Molecular System for Artificial Photosynthesis

Scientists Design Molecular System for Artificial Photosynthesis System is designed to mimic key functions of the photosynthetic center in green plants to convert solar energy into chemical energy stored by hydrogen fuel Etsuko Fujita and Gerald Manbeck of Brookhaven Lab's Chemistry Division carried out a series of experiments to understand why their molecular system with six light-absorbing centers (made of ruthenium metal ions bound to organic molecules) produced more hydrogen than the sys...
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Eco-labels and Green Stickers are labeling systems for food and consumer products. Ecolabels are voluntary, but green stickers are mandated by law.

Ecolabelling is a voluntary method of environmental performance certification and labelling that is practised around the world. An ecolabel identifies products or services proven environmentally preferable overall, within a specific product or service category. Eco-labels and Green Stickers are labeling systems for food and consumer products. Ecolabels are voluntary, but green stickers are mandated by law; for example, in North America major appliances and automobiles use Energy Star. They ar...
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Hong Kong Polytechnic University research on shoe insole helps to improve the performance of plantar pressure reduction and perceived comfort.

Hong Kong Polytechnic University research on shoe insole helps to improve the performance of plantar pressure reduction and perceived comfort. Orthotic insoles are commonly used in the treatment of the diabetic foot to prevent ulcerations. The insoles are normally custom-made to provide an optimum fit and reduce and/or redistribute pressure on different plantar regions. The multi-layered design of the insoles not only accommodates the foot shape and provides comfort, but also maximizes the fu...
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George Mason University’s College of Health and Human Services research suggest, prunes may prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women

If you need yet another reason to increase your intake of nutrient-rich fruits, here’s one. Consuming four to five prunes each day may help prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women, according to a manuscript released this month by Taylor C. Wallace, a professor in George Mason University’s College of Health and Human Services. The beneficial effects of dried plums on bone health could relate to the phenolics, a type of antioxidant, found in fruits, Wallace said. A handful of small clinic...
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Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center has developed a novel way to increase lipid production in bacteria

If you want to create sustainable biofuels from less and for less, you’ve got a range of options. And one of those options is to go microbial, enlisting the help of tiny but powerful bacteria in creating a range of renewable biofuels and chemicals. In a recent study published in mBio, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) assistant scientist Kim Lemmer and a team of collaborators focus on the microbes, reporting on a novel way to increase lipid production in bacteria. The finding ...
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Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is working to build Cool pavement to help keep cities cool

  Cool pavements can help keep cities cool, right? Yes, but according to new research from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), many reflective pavements have some unexpected drawbacks relative to conventional pavements when considering the entire life cycle of the materials. Scientists in Berkeley Lab’s Heat Island Group, in collaboration with the UC Pavement Research Center (UCPRC), the University of Southern California (USC), and thinkste...
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Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington research found that Tweaking a Molecules Structure Can Send It Down a Different Path to Crystallization

Tweaking a Molecules Structure Can Send It Down a Different Path to Crystallization Insights could lead to better control of drug development, energy technologies. And food. A small change to a peptoid that crystallizes in one step sends the modified peptoid down a more complicated path (shown here) from disordered clump to crystal. Image courtesy: Mike Perkins, PNNL Silky chocolate, a better medical drug, or solar panels all require the same thing: just the right crystals making up the mat...
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UNIVERSITY OF COPENHAGEN research suggest, food is not just the sum of its nutrients. It is time to rethink nutrition labelling

The nutritional value of a food should be evaluated on the basis of the foodstuff as a whole, and not as an effect of the individual nutrients. This is the conclusion of an international expert panel of epidemiologists, physicians, food and nutrition scientists and brought together by the University of Copenhagen and University of Reading. Their conclusion reshapes our understanding of the importance of nutrients and their interaction. Cheese have a lesser effect on blood cholesterol th...
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Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has solved the mistry as to why some rocks float on water for years

It’s true—some rocks can float on water for years at a time. And now scientists know how they do it, and what causes them to eventually sink. X-ray studies at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have helped scientists to solve this mystery by scanning inside samples of lightweight, glassy, and porous volcanic rocks known as pumice stones. The X-ray experiments were performed at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS), an X-ray sourc...
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University of Illinois, researchers have developed a simple, disposable sensor for detecting hazardous uranium ions

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a simple, disposable sensor for detecting hazardous uranium ions, with sensitivity that rivals the performance of much more sophisticated laboratory instruments.   The sensor provides a fast, on-site test for assessing uranium contamination in the environment, and the effectiveness of remediation strategies, said Yi Lu, a chemistry professor at Illinois and senior author of a paper accepted for publication in...
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Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM) is having its annual meeting on June 25 – 29 2017

The Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM) is the primary international organization dedicated to using neuroimaging to discover the organization of the human brain. OHBM is having its annual meeting on June 25 - 29 2017 Key few topic that will be covered include : Network effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on the prefrontal cortex Structural Imaging Evaluation of Subcallosal Cingulate DBS for Treatment-Resistant Depression Structural network architecture predi...
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Karolinska Institute in Stockholm research suggest Sleep Deprivation can have social, physical and mental impacts

We’ve always known that sleep is good for your brain, but new research from the University of Rochester provides the first direct evidence for why your brain cells need you to sleep (and sleep the right way—more on that later). The study found that when you sleep your brain removes toxic proteins from its neurons that are by-products of neural activity when you’re awake. Unfortunately, your brain can remove them adequately only while you’re asleep. So when you don’t get enough sleep, the toxic p...
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Pohang University of Science and Technology Research Suggest ‘Decorin’ can be the new Glue-Like Substance that could Be The Key to Healing Wounds Without Scars

Skin scarring after deep dermal injuries is a major clinical problem due to the current therapies limited to established scars with poor understanding of healing mechanisms. From investigation of aberrations within the extracellular matrix involved in pathophysiologic scarring, it was revealed that one of the main factors responsible for impaired healing is abnormal collagen reorganization. Here, inspired by the fundamental roles of decorin, a collagen-targeting proteoglycan, in collagen remodel...
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University of Tokyo research findings will now allow development of more effective mucosal vaccines, immunizing agents, that can be administered orally or through the nose rather then current injectable type of vaccines.

A research group at the University of Tokyo has identified in a study with mice a protein directly linked to the M cells' function to capture antigens around intestinal and other mucous membrane surfaces. Manipulating the protein, allograft inflammatory factor 1 (Aif1), holds promise of contributing to the development of more effective mucosal vaccines—immunizing agents, administered orally or through the nose, that enter the body via the mucous membrane—as an alternative to the conventional inj...
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University of Alabama research have developed more accurate way to determine adolescent obesity

The body mass index calculations that physicians have been relying on for decades may not be accurate for assessing body fat in adolescents between the ages of 8 and 17. A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics shows that tri-ponderal mass index estimates body fat more accurately than the traditional BMI in adolescents. These new findings are timely as diagnosing, treating and tracking the prevalence of children and adolescents with obesity ...
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UNSW Sydney research suggest bad moods are good for you, the surprising benefits of sadness

Homo sapiens is a very moody species. Even though sadness and bad moods have always been part of the human experience, we now live in an age that ignores or devalues these feelings. The Conversation In our culture, normal human emotions like temporary sadness are often treated as disorders. Manipulative advertising, marketing and self-help industries claim happiness should be ours for the asking. Yet bad moods remain an essential part of the normal range of moods we regularly experience. D...
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MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE OF MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY AND GENETICS research found a gene for brain size is only found in humans

A gene for brain size – only found in humans   This picture shows a cerebral cortex of an embryonic mouse. The cell nuclei are marked in blue and the deep-layer neurons in red. The human-specific gene ARHGAP11B was selectively expressed in the right half of the brain, which is visible by the folding of the neocortical surface. © MPI f. Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics Following the traces of evolution: Max Planck Researchers find a key to the reproduction of brain stem cells Abo...
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University of Delaware found that kids who are bullied in fifth grade often suffer from depression and begin using alcohol and other substances

When it comes to understanding bullying, "we make a lot of assumptions that aren't based on data," says UD psychologist Julie Hubbard, whose scholarship aims to build a stronger empirical foundation that could lead to new and more successful evidence-based programs for bullying. Although school-based bullying prevention programs already exist, findings suggest they are not particularly effective. Thus, Hubbard, an associate professor of psychology, believes that more basic research is needed ...
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Neuron Technology Summer School – JUNE 26TH TO JULY 7TH 2017

From JUNE 26TH TO JULY 7TH 2017 | SISSA The 7th Neuron Technology Summer School aims to provide practical and theoretical training on the application of a large spectrum of techniques to neuroscience. The School will address the following topics: Basic Electrophysiology Imaging and optical recordings Optical tweezers microscopy for single cell neurobiology Single-molecule imaging and single cell handling with Atomic Force Microscopy Basic Structural Biology Admission ...
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