UNIVERSITY OF UTAH RESEARCHERS DEVELOP FASTER, MORE ACCURATE TEST FOR LIVER CANCER THAT CAN BE ADMINISTERED ANYWHERE

It’s estimated that about 788,000 people worldwide died of liver cancer in 2015, the second-leading cause of cancer deaths, according to the latest statistics from the World Health Organization. One of the major challenges in combatting this disease is detecting it early because symptoms often don’t appear until later stages. But a team of researchers led by University of Utah chemical engineering and chemistry professor Marc Porter and U surgeon and professor Courtney Scaife has developed a ...
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piezoelectric sensor is a device that uses the piezoelectric effect, to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain, or force by converting them to an electrical charge

A piezoelectric sensor is a device that uses the piezoelectric effect, to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain, or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The prefix piezo- is Greek for 'press' or 'squeeze'. A proper knowledge of the interaction between human physiology and daily living environmental conditions is essential to establish a connection between an individual’s lifestyle and his/her health status. Understanding these connections will give insight ...
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High Dietary Energy Density (DED) foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status

Dietary energy density (DED) is defined as the amount of available energy per unit of weight in the diet. It is generally expressed as kJ/g. Experimental studies in human subjects and a recent systematic review have shown that the consumption of high-energy-dense diets may lead to increased energy intake and weight gain, and evidence has been accumulating for an association between lower DED and better nutritional quality of the diet. In Swedish children and teenagers, it was found that low-e...
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Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a new technique using high-frequency alternating magnetic fields to heat artificial joints in the body

A short exposure to an alternating magnetic field might someday replace multiple surgeries and weeks of IV antibiotics as treatment for stubborn infections on artificial joints, new research suggests. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have shown that high-frequency alternating magnetic fields – the same principle used in induction cooktops – can be used to destroy bacteria that are encased in a slimy “biofilm” growing on a metal surface. The biofilm is a collection of microorganis...
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Boston Children’s Hospital have found a new way to non-invasively relieve pain at local sites in the body using ultrasound

According to the CDC, 91 people die from opioid overdoses every day in the U.S. Here in Massachusetts, the state has an opioid-related death rate that is more than twice the national average. “Opioid abuse is a growing problem in healthcare,” says Daniel Kohane, MD, PhD, a senior associate in critical care medicine at Boston Children’s and professor of anesthesiology at Harvard Medical School. Now, Kohane and other scientists who are developing triggerable drug delivery systems at Bost...
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North Carolina State University Spheroid Stem Cell Production Sows Hope for IPF (Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis)Treatment

In a small pilot study, researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a rapid, simple way to generate large numbers of lung stem cells for use in disease treatment. This method of harvesting and growing a patient’s own lung stem cells shows promise in mice for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and could one day provide human IPF sufferers with an effective, less invasive method of treatment for their disease. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic ir...
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University of Chicago genetically modified skin cells to produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) protein that is beneficial in diabetes and obesity

A research team based at the University of Chicago has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy and demonstrated how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat many human diseases. In the August 3, 2017 issue of the journal Cell Stem Cell, the researchers provide “proof-of-concept.” They describe gene-therapy administered through skin transplants to treat two related and extremely common human ailments: type-2 diabetes a...
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Drug developed at the University of Rochester Medical Center protected mice from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

A drug developed at the University of Rochester Medical Center protected mice from one of the many ills of our cheeseburger and milkshake-laden Western diet – non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In a study out today in the journal JCI Insights, scientists report that a drug called “URMC-099” reversed liver inflammation, injury and scarring in animals fed a diet high in fat, sugar and cholesterol. The diet was designed to replicate the Western fast food diet and recreate the features of non-alc...
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DIABETES SENTRY is a non-invasive, wearable electronic device which sounds an alarm when blood glucose threshold readings have been reached

The DIABETES SENTRY is an affordable, non-invasive, wearable electronic device which sounds an alarm while being worn on the wrist, ankle, or bicep of persons with diabetes whose blood glucose has begun to trend downward. In 90% of the cases, persons with diabetes show one or both of two hallmark symptoms of trending toward hypoglycemia, increased perspiration and a drop in skin temperature. This patient base is considered to be symptomatic. The 10% of individuals with diabetes that do NOT...
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Soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients, opening new approaches to gait re-training and rehabilitation

soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients, opening new approaches to gait re-training and rehabilitation Upright walking on two legs is a defining trait in humans, enabling them to move very efficiently throughout their environment. This can all change in the blink of an eye when a stroke occurs. In about 80% of patients post-stroke, it is typical that one limb loses its ability to function normally — a clinical phenomenon called hemiparesis. And even patients ...
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Salk Institute, Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and Korea’s Institute for Basic Science research scientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing.

EARLY GENE-EDITING SUCCESS HOLDS PROMISE FOR PREVENTING INHERITED DISEASES Scientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos Scientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos Scientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing. The technique, which uses the CRISPR-Cas9 system, corrected the mutation for a heart condition at the earliest stage of ...
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VCU Massey Cancer Center Scientists targeted the gene CtBP with a drug known as HIPP (2-hydroxy-imino phenylpyruvic acid) and were able to reduce the development of pre-cancerous polyps by half for colon cancer

Preclinical experiments, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a new way in which colon cancer develops, as well as a potential “silver bullet” for preventing and treating it. The findings may extend to ovarian, breast, lung, prostate and potentially other cancers that depend on the same mechanism for growth. Led by Massey’s Deputy Director Steven Grossman, M.D., Ph.D., a team of scientists targeted the gene CtBP with a drug known as HIPP (2-hydroxy-imino phenylpyruvic acid) ...
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Lifeflo has developed oxygen producing small pouch/device for home care and remote patients.

Lifeflo has developed oxygen producing small pouch for home care and remote patients. FDA cleared device designed to provide oxygen at 6 Liters / Minute for 15-20 Minutes. No prescription is required and has a 3 year shelf life.  Within 60 seconds or less 99.9% oxygen is flowing.   Lifeflo™ products produce medical grade 99.9% oxygen utilizing their patent pending technology.  Each product allows to simply and affordably provide oxygen to anyone experiencing a challenging healt...
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Purdue University scientists have developed a new surgical glue that’s based on the proteins of sea mussels and other animals

Non-toxic glue modeled after adhesive proteins produced by mussels and other creatures has been found to out-perform commercially available products, pointing toward potential surgical glues to replace sutures and staples. More than 230 million major surgeries are performed worldwide each year, and over 12 million traumatic wounds are treated in the United States alone. About 60 percent of these wounds are closed using mechanical methods such as sutures and staples. “Sutures and staples have s...
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Rockefeller University Scientists use algorithm to peer through opaque brains

Trying to pinpoint signals from individual neurons within a block of brain tissue is like trying to count headlights in thick fog. A new algorithm, developed by researchers based at The Rockefeller University, brings this brain activity into focus. In research described June 26 in Nature Methods, the team, led by Rockefeller’s Alipasha Vaziri, used a light microscope-based technique to capture neural activity within a volume of mouse brain tissue at unprecedented speed. The algorithm allowed ...
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Augusta University research suggest, age and obesity conspire to damage the tiny blood vessels that feed the heart, causing heart failure

Age and obesity appear to create a perfect storm that can reduce blood flow through the tiny blood vessels that directly feed our heart muscle and put us at risk for heart failure, scientists report. They call it “aged fat” and scientists now have evidence that the inflammation created by both age and fat have an additive effect that can thicken the walls of our coronary microvasculature without any  evidence of  the classic atherosclerotic plaque that many of us associate with heart disease....
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FDA approved gammaCore a non-invasive vagus nerve stimulator from electroCore to treat acute pain

electroCore, a neuroscience and technology company dedicated to improving patient outcomes through technological advancement, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released the use of gammaCore® (non-invasive vagus nerve stimulator) for the acute treatment of pain associated with episodic cluster headache in adult patients. gammaCore transmits a mild electrical stimulation to the vagus nerve through the skin, resulting in a reduction of pain. This is the first FDA product re...
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Sao Paulo Medical journal research suggest, patient mortality rate is Influenced of time elapsed from end of emergency surgery until admission to intensive care unit.

Influence of time elapsed from end of emergency surgery until admission to intensive care unit, on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) prediction and patient mortality rate The intensive care unit is the part of the hospital that is dedicated to providing a system of continuous surveillance for seriously ill patients who are potentially recoverable or at risk.1 The high-complexity features of these services and their high cost make it difficult to offer enough beds i...
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Patients whose emergency surgery is delayed are at higher risk of death

BACKGROUND: Delay of surgery for hip fracture is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, but the effects of surgical delays on mortality and resource use in the context of other emergency surgeries is poorly described. Our objective was to measure the independent association between delay of emergency surgery and in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs. METHODS: We identified all adult patients who underwent emergency noncardiac surgery between January 2012 an...
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Neddleless computer controlled drug injection

The Portal drug delivery technology is needle-free, fast and computer-controlled. It automatically adjusts the injection velocity up to one thousand times in the half-second it takes to completely deliver a 1 ml dose. The result is the precise administration of high viscosity biologic drugs through the skin, via an extremely collimated jet, the size of a strand of hair. HIPPA-compliant, automatic collection and transfer of injection and health data sets a new standard of engagement between the c...
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University of Texas researcher have identified how pythons regenerate their organs and other secrets of the snake genome.

Evolution takes eons, but it leaves marks on the genomes of organisms that can be detected with DNA sequencing and analysis. As methods for studying and comparing genetic data improve, scientists are beginning to decode these marks to reconstruct the evolutionary history of species, as well as how variants of genes give rise to unique traits. A research team at the University of Texas at Arlington led by assistant professor of biology Todd Castoe has been exploring the genomes of snakes an...
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Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and Virginia Tech research study finds common household chemicals are responsible for diminished reproduction in mice

Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and Virginia Tech researchers who were using a disinfectant when handling mice have discovered that two active ingredients in it cause declines in mouse reproduction. Although the chemicals responsible for the declines are common in household cleaning products and disinfectants used in medical and food preparation settings, including hand sanitizers, academic scientists have never published a rigorous study, until now, on their safety or toxicity...
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University of Notre Dame have found that exposure to just 10 minutes of light at night suppresses biting and manipulates flight behavior in the Anopheles gambiae mosquito.

Scientists at the University of Notre Dame have found that exposure to just 10 minutes of light at night suppresses biting and manipulates flight behavior in the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, the major vector for transmission of malaria in Africa, according to new research published in the journal Parasites and Vectors. Critical behaviors exhibited by the species, such as feeding, egg laying and flying, are time-of-day specific, including a greater propensity for nighttime biting. A recent repo...
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3D cell culture is an artificially-created environment in which biological cells are permitted to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions

3D cell culture is an artificially-created environment in which biological cells are permitted to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions. Unlike 2D environments (e.g. a petri dish), a 3D cell culture allows cells in vitro to grow in all directions, similar to how they would in vivo. These three-dimensional cultures are usually grown in bioreactors, small capsules in which the cells can grow into spheroids, or 3D cell colonies. Approximately 300 spheroids are usually cul...
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UNIVERSITAT ROVIRA research suggest Obesity alters the relationship between a biomarker of iron levels and the incidence of type 2 diabetes

Obesity alters the relationship between a biomarker of iron levels and the incidence of type 2 diabetes The association between levels of a biomarker known as the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a population with high cardiovascular risk is conditioned by the presence of absence of obesity Whereas in non-obese people, high levels of the soluble transferrin receptor are associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, in obese people t...
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University of Maryland Medical Center research suggest flax seeds provide nutrients and also health benefits to reduce the risk of chronic diseases

Flaxseed is emerging as an important functional food ingredient because of its rich contents of α-linolenic acid (ALA, omega-3 fatty acid), lignans, and fiber. Flaxseed oil, fibers and flax lignans have potential health benefits such as in reduction of cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, autoimmune and neurological disorders. Flax protein helps in the prevention and treatment of heart disease and in supporting the immune system. As a functional ...
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‘PolarityTE’ novel regenerative medicine and tissue engineering platform that employs patients’ own cells for the healing of full-thickness functionally-polarized tissues

Functionally Polarized Tissue Polarity is an entirely new and radically unique regenerative medicine company committed to developing the first forms of functionally-polarized autologous tissues for use in medical procedures requiring reconstructive applications by surgeons and wound care specialists. At PolarityTE, revolutionary platform is being developed to induce cell and tissue polarity, creating uniquely functional tissue to mirror natural development in the human body. Using i...
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Radboud University Netherlands research suggest learning to read in your thirties profoundly transforms brain networks

Reading is such a modern cultural invention that, so far, there is no specific area in the human brain dedicated to it. An international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen and the MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have found that learning to read as an adult reconfigures brain areas hitherto assigned to different skills. Most strikingly, evolutionarily ancient structures - located deep inside the brain - are more fundame...
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3D bioprinting is the process of creating cell patterns in a confined space using 3D printing technologies

3D bioprinting is the process of creating cell patterns in a confined space using 3D printing technologies, where cell function and viability are preserved within the printed construct. Current 3D printing technology has advanced quickly in recent years, enabling people to print 3D models of non-living objects. More recently, researchers in the biomedicine have also begun to use this technology to print human organs and tissues with devices called “3D Bioprinters.” Wake Forest Institute for R...
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Rush University medical Center research suggest, skin color is no shield against melanoma

Sidney Brown thought the mole on his nose was just an annoying pimple. He didn’t consider that it could be a cancerous tumor, because, Brown thought, “skin cancer is something white people get.” The misconception that people with more pigment — called melanin — in their skin cells are protected from cancer-causing ultraviolet rays nearly cost Brown his life. Non-whites have higher melanoma-related mortality rates Brown’s mole turned out to be a melanoma, the least common form of skin cancer...
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