CathVision is developing next generation non-invasive technology to guide therapy for arrhythmia

CathVision is developing non-invasive technology to guide therapy for arrhythmia. The company's product visualizes the smallest heart signals. High quality electrophysiology signals are a key component of delivering accurate therapy to complex arrhythmia. Approximately 2% of the Western population suffers from cardiac arrhythmia, and hospital-based catheter ablation procedures are directed at terminating arrhythmia. Still, a number of challenging arrhythmia suffers from unsatisfactory low eff...
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Eco-labels and Green Stickers are labeling systems for food and consumer products. Ecolabels are voluntary, but green stickers are mandated by law.

Ecolabelling is a voluntary method of environmental performance certification and labelling that is practised around the world. An ecolabel identifies products or services proven environmentally preferable overall, within a specific product or service category. Eco-labels and Green Stickers are labeling systems for food and consumer products. Ecolabels are voluntary, but green stickers are mandated by law; for example, in North America major appliances and automobiles use Energy Star. They ar...
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FDA has approved Siemens new CT Scanner SOMATOM that can be operated from a tablet and is able to perform faster higher quality image exam

Siemens announced winning FDA clearance for its SOMATOM go. Now and SOMATOM go.Up compute tomography scanners. The systems are designed to speed patients through the scanning process, utilizing preset workflows that are defined and controlled using a wireless tablet. Siemens’ latest high-end scanner is a Dual Source technology called SOMATOM® Definition Flash, a scanner that will change radiation dose. https://youtu.be/sFTUDGanglM Now available with the fully integrated Stellar Detec...
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Citizen science is the involvement of the public in scientific research – whether community-driven research or global investigations. The Citizen Science Association unites expertise from educators, scientists, data managers, and others to power citizen science.

Citizen science is the involvement of the public in scientific research – whether community-driven research or global investigations. The Citizen Science Association unites expertise from educators, scientists, data managers, and others to power citizen science What is Citizen Science? The Oxford English Dictionary recently defined citizen science as: “scientific work undertaken by members of the general public, often in collaboration with or under the direction of professional scientists and ...
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Public Lab is a community and non-profit organization that is democratizing science to address environmental issues that affect people

Public Lab is a community where you can learn how to investigate environmental concerns. Using inexpensive DIY techniques, we seek to change how people see the world in environmental, social, and political terms. Communities lack access to the tools and techniques needed to participate in decisions being made about their communities, especially when facing environmental hazards. Public Lab is an open network of community organizers, educators, technologists and researchers working to creat...
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Research to understand loneliness and isolation in a society and understand part of the experiences for different situations

From Greek mythology and the Bible to modern critiques of the digital age, loneliness has been portrayed as part of the human condition. With modern society requiring more and more attention away from family, its currently being recognized as a significant adverse consequence of loneliness  and health. Loneliness and isolation are increasingly part of the experience for many. As societies are evolving globally in many different ways as, reduced inter-generational living, different societies c...
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Emmanuel College researchers have developed mathematical argument for stable families or stable friendships

Emmanuel College scientists, Martin Nowak and Ben Allen (Researcher) developed an algorithm to predict whether a social structure is likely to favor cooperation. Their findings suggest strong pairwise relationships, rather than loose scattered networks, are more favorable for cooperation. Professor Allen and his collaborators have derived a condition for when cooperative behaviors will be able to spread across a network via natural selection. Using mathematical modeling, they have found that ...
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Australia’s Changing Demography

Households in Australia Changing demography The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) is the Australian Government's key research body in the area of family wellbeing. AIFS conducts original research to increase understanding of Australian families and the issues that affect them. Listed below are the findings; Types of families in Australia Types of households Projections: 2011-36 couple families with children will decrease from 44.1% in 2011 to 40.2% in ...
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Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology South Korea has created a metal-based substance that works to cut out amyloid-β, the protein vital for the development of Alzheimer’s disease

Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, or UNIST, in South Korea has created a metal-based substance that works to cut out amyloid-β, the protein vital for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers found that by hydrolyzing, a process of splitting a molecule apart using water, amyloid-beta proteins using a crystal structure called tetra-N methylated cyclam, or TMC, they could reduce the toxicity of Aβ. The team used cobalt, nickel, copper and zinc placed at the center...
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University of Tokyo suggest calcium controls sleep duration. Change in calcium concentration in neurons determines sleep or waking state

University of Tokyo and RIKEN researchers have identified seven genes responsible for causing mice to stay awake or fall asleep based on a theoretical model of sleep and on experiments using 21 different genetically-modified mice, some of which showed different sleep durations. Researchers hope that their research will contribute to the understanding and treatment of sleep disorders and associated neurodegenerative diseases. All animals appear to sleep for varying durations. In humans, sleep ...
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UCLA neuroscience research suggests, people who had the strongest responses in the areas of the brain associated with perceiving pain and emotion and imitating others were also the most generous.

Your brain might be hard-wired for altruism It’s an age-old quandary: Are we born “noble savages” whose best intentions are corrupted by civilization, as the 18th century Swiss philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau contended? Or are we fundamentally selfish brutes who need civilization to rein in our base impulses, as the 17th century English philosopher Thomas Hobbes argued? After exploring the areas of the brain that fuel our empathetic impulses — and temporarily disabling other regions that o...
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Citizen science is the involvement of the public in scientific research – whether community-driven research or global investigations

Citizen science is the involvement of the public in scientific research – whether community-driven research or global investigations. The Citizen Science Association unites expertise from educators, scientists, data managers, and others to power citizen science. Join us, and help speed innovation by sharing insights across disciplines. https://youtu.be/UVuEsuk9Dgc   Whether through grassroots action or technology-mediated crowdsourcing, there has been a rapid increase in public par...
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Trinity College Dublin Research & Berkeley College Research On Superbug Evolution And Microbial Antibiotic Resistance With Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT)

Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the movement of genetic material between unicellular and/or multicellular organisms other than via vertical transmission (the transmission of DNA from parent to offspring.) HGT is synonymous with lateral gene transfer (LGT) and the terms are interchangeable. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the sharing of genetic material between organisms that are not in a parent–offspring relationship. HGT is a widely recognized mechanism for adaptation in bacteria and arc...
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‘LEVL’ measures body fat using your breath

LEVL is a consumer health and wellness device that will measure a molecule (acetone) in your breath using an innovative nanosensor. With the press of a button and a quick breath, LEVL will measure your fat burning state. Simply breathe into the breath pod and place the pod into the testing port. LEVL is designed to detect trace amounts of acetone in your breath when your body is burning fat. Simply breathe into LEVL. Your breath is captured and analyzed by our groundbreaking nanosensor, provi...
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Australia’s demographic statistics

On 19 December 2016  the resident population of Australia is projected to be: 24,302,302 This projection is based on the estimated resident population at 30 June 2016 and assumes growth since then of: one birth every 1 minute and 40 seconds, one death every 3 minutes and 17 seconds, a net gain of one international migration every 2 minutes and 25 seconds, leading to an overall total population increase of one person every 1 minute and 24 seconds. According to the estimated population ...
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What sets us apart from other species

Earlier this year, the Royal Institution invited the philosopher AC Grayling, along with Igor Aleksander, professor of neural systems engineering at Imperial College, London, and the historian Felipe Fernandez Armesto, to discuss the question 'What makes us human?' Igor Aleksander claims to have built a robot that has consciousness - he was there to address the ways in which human intelligence differs from artificial intelligence. Fernandez Armesto has written a book called So You Think You're H...
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Trinity College Study on ‘Identities in Transformation’. The study examines the relationship between globalization, culture and identity

Identities, both on the level of the individual and the collective, are formed and develop in complex processes that negotiate attitudes, values and behaviours, and shape our social and cultural practices. Identity debates are occurring through reflection on the decade of commemoration and the wider re-evaluation of Irishness, and also in the context of massively changing migratory patterns in both Ireland and Europe.  These transformations are embedded within the context of greater global inter...
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Mice Studies in Space Offer Clues on Bone Loss

Astronauts know their bodies will be tested during time spent on the International Space Station, from the 15 daily sunrises and sunsets wreaking havoc on their circadian rhythms to the lack of gravity that weakens bone density and muscle. NASA is working to counteract these otherworldly challenges to enable long-term human exploration of space. For example, special lighting helps with sleep, and rigorous exercise helps keep astronauts’ bodies strong. But, frustratingly, bone loss continue...
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University Of Washington research shows encounters with nearby nature helps our wellbeing

Encounters with nearby nature help alleviate mental fatigue by relaxing and restoring the mind. Within built environments parks and green spaces are settings for cognitive respite, as they encourage social interaction and de-stressing through exercise or conversation, and provide calming settings. Having quality landscaping and vegetation in and around the places where people work and study is a good investment. Both visual access and being within green space helps to restore the mind’s ability ...
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MIT Research on recording analog memories in human cells

MIT biological engineers have devised a memory storage system as a DNA-embedded meter that is recording the activity of a signaling pathway in a human cell. MIT biological engineers have devised a way to record complex histories in the DNA of human cells, allowing them to retrieve “memories” of past events, such as inflammation, by sequencing the DNA. This analog memory storage system — the first that can record the duration and/or intensity of events in human cells — could also help scien...
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NASA to sequence DNA in space for first time

July 16, a Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled to blast off from Cape Canaveral to the International Space Station carrying a DNA sequencer into space for the first time. While this isn’t big-deal science, no one has ever tried to decode DNA in outer space before. Being able to is something that might come in handy on a Mars mission if a crewmember gets sick or alien mold appears in a spaceship. “Right now we culture stuff and return it to Earth, but if you send people to Mars you aren’t going to...
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Nasa’s Research Agrees To ‘An Orange a Day Keeps Scurvy Away’

Centuries ago, ships often sailed with crews numbering in the hundreds returning with tens. Cause of death: Scurvy – a severe depletion of Vitamin C. Today’s explorers cross miles of space with no hope of finding an island with food and nutrients along the way. All nutritional needs must be met aboard. “Nutrition is vital to the mission,” Scott M. Smith, Ph.D., manager for NASA’s Nutritional Biochemistry Lab said. “Without proper nutrition for the astronauts, the mission will fail. It’s that ...
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Philips proprietary camera based monitoring technology measures absolute arterial blood oxygenation (SpO2) levels without ever touching the patient

Absolute oxygen saturation of arterial blood (SpO2), a vital sign that is commonly monitored in hospitalized and other patients, can be accurately measured across multiple patients using contactless technology. The study, published in the June issue of the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia, used Philips proprietary camera-based monitoring technology to measure the light reflected off the foreheads of 41 healthy adults to calculate SpO2. Through the results of this study, Philips, a global leade...
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NASA Is Testing Next-Generation Fire Shelters

NASA reached an agreement with the US Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service to test prototype fire shelters made from the space agency's next-generation thermal protection systems (TPM) materials—intended, initially, to protect future spacecraft upon re-entry (in fact, a first generation of the material has already been tested on the agency's third Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment vehicle, IRVE-3). Not unlike a spacecraft tearing through the atmosphere, NASA’s hope is that its mater...
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‘Leaf’ Healthcare Ulcer Sensor

Ulcer is something that affects everyone just about as they get older. Scientists believe that inactivity and constant sitting can also be one of the reasons of causing ulcers. The Leaf Healthcare Sensor is designed to alert a person when it is time to turn and do some moving in order to combat no moving around. The tri-axial accelerometer that is in the sensor can monitor the position that a person is in and then help assist them in proper ways to turn. It even works with optimizing tissue pres...
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Life expectancy

Life expectancy is a statistical measure of the average time an organism is expected to live, based on the year of their birth, their current age and other demographic factors including sex. The most commonly used measure of life expectancy is at birth (LEB), which can be defined in two ways: while cohort LEB is the mean length of life of an actual birth cohort (all individuals born a given year) and can be computed only for cohorts born many decades ago, so that all their members died, period L...
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Innovative Wearable Gadgets

Everykey: Everykey is a stylish wristband that replaces keys and passwords; it utilizes AES 128-bit encryption to grant access to key and password enabled devices. This Bluetooth enabled band gives immediate access to your password-protected gadgets, physically locked items including doors, car doors, bike locks, and more. It works with Windows, Mac OS, Linux, Android, and iOS. Nudge: Nudge is the nifty notification wristband that notifies you about important work email, or a phone call tha...
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Telemedicine technologies can provide clinical health care globally

Telemedicine is the use of telecommunication and information technologies to provide clinical health care at a distance. It helps eliminate distance barriers and can improve access to medical services that would often not be consistently available in distant rural communities. It is also used to save lives in critical care and emergency situations. Although there were distant precursors to telemedicine, it is essentially a product of 20th century telecommunication and information technologies...
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University of Tokyo’s 6th sense headband

University of Tokyo is developing a wearable and modular device allowing users to perceive and respond to spatial information using haptic cues in an intuitive and unobtrusive way. The system is composed of an array of "optical-hair modules", each of which senses range information and transduces it as an appropriate vibro-tactile cue on the skin directly beneath it (the module can be embedded on clothes or strapped to body parts as in the figures below). An analogy for our artificial sensory sys...
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NASA is developing the capabilities needed to send humans to Mars

NASA is developing the capabilities needed to send humans to an asteroid by 2025 and Mars in the 2030s – goals outlined in the bipartisan NASA Authorization Act of 2010 and in the U.S. National Space Policy, also issued in 2010. Mars is a rich destination for scientific discovery and robotic and human exploration as we expand our presence into the solar system. Its formation and evolution are comparable to Earth, helping us learn more about our own planet’s history and future. Mars had condit...
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