Seoul National University research demonstrated natural technique to increase egg production in chickens

A research team led by Professors Doman Kim and Tae Sub Park of the Graduate School of International Agricultural Technology found that chicken feed including naturally fermented buckwheat increases the production of eggs by over 8%. The researchers used Rhizopus – a fungus causing the group of infections referred to as zygomycosis and usually found in decaying breads, fruits, and vegetables – to ferment the buckwheat. The team found that chickens eating the buckwheat feed laid more and larger eggs.

 The buckwheat-fed chickens laid 8.2% more eggs than the control group. The weights of the egg white and shell of these eggs were heavier by 2.1% and 5.8% respectively, and the L-Carnitine and GABA (Gamma-Amino Butyric acid) contents in the eggs were also 13.6% and 8.4% greater.

40 chickens were divided into two groups, with one group receiving feed that included 1.6% of the fermented buckwheat, and were examined over a period of a month. The buckwheat-fed chickens laid 8.2% more eggs than the control group. The weights of the egg white and shell of these eggs were heavier by 2.1% and 5.8% respectively, and the L-Carnitine and GABA (Gamma-Amino Butyric acid) contents in the eggs were also 13.6% and 8.4% greater.

L-Carnitine is a substance that decomposes fatty acid, and is effective in improving infertility, chronic fatigue, and weight loss. GABA has been shown to help relieve depression and strengthen immunity, and is largely found in kimchi and yoghurt. Carnitine  is a quaternary ammonium compound[1] involved in metabolism in most mammals, plants and some bacteria.[2] Carnitine may exist in two isomers, labeled D-carnitine and L-carnitine, as they are optically active. At room temperature, pure carnitine is a white

Carnitine is a quaternary ammonium compound involved in metabolism in most mammals, plants and some bacteria. Carnitine may exist in two isomers, labeled D-carnitine and L-carnitine, as they are optically active. At room temperature, pure carnitine is a white powder, and a water-soluble zwitterion with low toxicity. Carnitine only exists in animals as the L-enantiomer, and D-carnitine is toxic because it inhibits the activity of L-carnitine.

Glycine propionyl-L-carnitine.svg

The research team said, “this study opens the door to creating various types of high-quality food products without the use of chemical treatment.”

The research findings were published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.

The buckwheat-fed chickens laid 8.2% more eggs than the control group. The weights of the egg white and shell of these eggs were heavier by 2.1% and 5.8% respectively, and the L-Carnitine and GABA (Gamma-Amino Butyric acid) contents in the eggs were also 13.6% and 8.4% greater.

 

Credit: Seoul National University

 

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