George Mason University has developed fire extinguisher that uses sound waves to extinguish fire

Engineering students Seth Robertson and Viet Tran of George Mason University in Virginia have invented a revolutionary device that uses low-frequency sound waves to extinguish fire instead of water, gas or foam.

The young engineers used $600 worth of equipment, including a speaker, amps and a collimeter, to starve the flame of oxygen, thus putting it out.

The fire extinguisher uses low frequencies between 30 and 60 hertz ranges to blast the fire, separating oxygen from the fuel.

New type of extinguisher that uses sound waves to put out fires has been built by two engineering students in the US. Both chemical- and water-free, the invention offers a relatively non-destructive method of fire control, which could find applications in fighting small fires in the home, and the researchers now hold a preliminary patent application for their device.

The principle behind the extinguisher is simple: as they are mechanical pressure waves that cause vibrations in the medium in which they travel, sound waves have the potential to manipulate both burning material and the oxygen that surrounds it. If the sound could be used to separate the two, the fire would be starved of oxygen and, accordingly, would be snuffed out.

The fire extinguisher uses low-frequency sound waves to douse a blaze. Engineering seniors Viet Tran and Seth Robertson now hold a preliminary patent application for their potentially revolutionizing device.

Sound waves physically separate fire from its fuel source.

 

 

Credit :www.gmu.edu

 

 

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